Category Archives: Ravelry tutorial

The Fit Is The Thing

I love knitting for other people. Over half of the things I’ve knit since I started were gifts for others. There’s one major drawback to knitting for others though, and that is fit. It’s especially difficult if it’s a surprise gift. My current project is for a friend and it’s a surprise. I was totally at a loss as I KNEW that it needed to be bigger than last time I knit this same project, but I wasn’t sure HOW much bigger.

In this case I got lucky. I’m friends with the recipient’s spouse, so I was able to ask them to measure for me and report back. Once I got the measurements it was just a matter of looking at others’ projects and using that knowledge to adapt to my measurements. How do you do that? Keep reading for the tutorial!

Now sometimes, changing the size of something is as simple as going up or down a few needle sizes or changing the weight of the yarn you’re using. If the pattern calls for bulky and is a men’s sweater, change the yarn to DK and you will automatically have a smaller sweater. Similarly, if you’re knitting a pair of mitts and just need them to be larger, casting on a few more stitches and going up a needle size or two will result in a larger mitt. For more in depth changes, however, math is involved. This is not the post that explains how to do that.

This conversion gets even easier if you’re using Ravelry! When you look at the pattern page for any pattern listed on the site, there is a tab with a number and then the word projects. It will look like what is in the red circle:

Clicking that tab will show you every project for that pattern that’s been entered on Ravelry, along with their pictures and pattern notes. From there you can go to advanced search and look for projects made with the yarn weight or needle size you’re thinking of. 
Click advanced search to get this:
I’ve highlighted yarn weights in red in this pic. 
Granted, not everyone puts their project notes on their project pages. However, it can be a great jumping off point in your own experiments to get the perfect size for you or your recipient!